Tag Archives: People

Aside

“We do not grow absolutely, chronologically. We grow sometimes in one dimension, and not in another; unevenly. We grow partially. We are relative. We are mature in one realm, childish in another. The past, present, and future mingle and pull … Continue reading

Be Happy For No Reason

“When you’re happy for no reason, you bring happiness to your outer experiences rather than trying to extract happiness from them. You don’t need to manipulate the world around you to try to make yourself happy. You live from happiness, rather than for happiness.”

– Marci Shimoff

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Emit Your Own Frequency

Emit Your Own Frequency

Connecting and Disconnecting

Came across the article written below…and there are some gems. Awareness of self and your surroundings is so important — for your mental, physical, spiritual, and even financial being. In order to be aware we have to be engaged beyond the latest gossip/news, trending topics, and status updates taking place each moment on our touch screens; we have to actively live in the outside world and take advantage of the opportunity to connect with people through our natural senses.

Take a few minutes to read the article below, I will bet that it resonates with you.

Original Source
Written by Whitney Hess

We have become a society of people who avoid each other. Our instinct is no longer to extend ourselves to help a fellow human being in need, but rather to protect ourselves, our feelings, our time. We hide. We prefer to be alone. We prefer to sit back and observe. We prefer to climb inside our devices than to live out in the world.

We screen our calls. We send 10 texts rather than make a one-minute phone call. We don’t reply to emails. We cross to the other side of the street. We stare at our phone in the elevator. We avoid making eye contact. We pray we’ll get their voicemail. We hold the door-close button when we see them coming.

It wasn’t more than a couple generations ago that people would sit on chairs outside their home waiting to see who would walk by. It wasn’t that long ago that people would stop by one another’s homes unannounced. We used to crave face-to-face connection; now we evade it.

Each step ‘forward’ has made it easier, just a little, to avoid the emotional work of being present, to convey information rather than humanity.”

~ Jonathan Safran FoerHow Not to Be Alone

So how is this impacting us? We are so plugged in that we are losing our ability to connect. The less present we are in our own bodies and with others, the less capacity we have for empathy and compassion. The less we’re able to fulfill another person’s needs (or even want to!), and the less we’re able to have our needs fulfilled in return.

We are losing our ability to live a compassionate life because we’re so out of practice. That leads us to make more assumptions about other people based on our own experiences — the only thing we know. And it turns out we don’t know anything.

We are knowing ourselves less and less, and we’re feeling powerless as a result. Because we’re hunched over our computers, hunched over our phones and tablets, our heart centers are facing down — towards our devices. Our backs are to the world. And this posture is negatively affecting our own views of self-worth and our capacity for self-awareness. How we pose shapes how we feel. All these distractions, the lack of physical motion, and the lack of presence all combines to disconnect us not only from one another, but from ourselves.

Simone Weil wrote, “Attention is the rarest and purest form of generosity.” By this definition, our relationships to the world, and to one another, and to ourselves, are becoming increasingly miserly.

We often use technology to save time, but increasingly, it either takes the saved time along with it, or makes the saved time less present, intimate and rich. I worry that the closer the world gets to our fingertips, the further it gets from our hearts. It’s not an either/or — being “anti-technology” is perhaps the only thing more foolish than being unquestioningly “pro-technology” — but a question of balance that our lives hang upon.”

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Dove’s Real Beauty Sketches

On natural beauty..

“It impacts the friends we make, the jobs we apply for, how we treat our children — it impacts everything. It couldn’t be more critical to our happiness.”

That’s a pretty taunting thought…to think that the only way to achieve heightened success is to look a particular way. For one, success is relative. What it means to me may not have the same meaning for you. Secondly, if we purely rely on physical attributes to get what we want in life, then maybe beauty isn’t just physical, but largely mental stimulation – given that the desire to be perfect drives our behavior. In terms of society’s standards, there is without a doubt underlying pressure for women to have the brightest eyes, the prettiest face a hair, the sexiest body, etc..

Dove recently conducted a social experiment in which Gil Zamora, a 26-year veteran of the Santa Fe Police Department and forensic artist, sketched a group of seven women to get a better idea of how they view themselves.

The first part of the experiment was to sketch one woman at a time, without ever seeing what they look like. Zamora would ask them questions about their own facial aesthetics, revealing what they think their most prominent, favorite and disliked features are. Based on these descriptions, Zamora created a sketch of each woman. He then repeated this process but instead asked each of the seven strangers to describe the other women that they had met earlier that morning.

What Zamora found was that the women seemed extremely critical of themselves…even over delicate freckles; alternatively, when they spoke about the other ladies that they had met only briefly, they were more complimentary and even admiring of their features. Zamora held the self-imposed sketches next to the those created by the women viewing one another, and the reactions were pretty consistent: many woman don’t seem to see the beauty that others see in them. Or, maybe they do but just don’t acknowledge how wonderful their natural beauty is.

“We spend a lot of time as women analyzing and trying to fix the things that aren’t quite right…Instead we should spend more time appreciating the things that we do like.”

It’s true, women really are their own worst critics. I know that I am and have been my own for a very long time. But who doesn’t want to be “perfect”, you know? Whatever that is..

Self-love is beautiful. It’s necessary to love inwardly in order to love outwardly. Thank you, Dove, for sharing your message.